"Nurses in Action" - San Francisco to Peru

Monday, May 5, 2014 - 10:28

A wise person once said, "Be the CHANGE you wish to see in the world" ... and a group of future health care professionals decided to do just THAT!!! During Spring Break 2014, 43 San Francisco State University Nursing students went on  a life-changing journey ... as they made a contribution towards a positive change in the world!

"Nurses in Action" team, a group of SF State Nursing students, provided health care for 1000 people of Peru through International Volunteer Headquarters (IVHQ). The focus of this service project was Community Health and School Health. Patient education, basic medications, and complete head-to-toe assessments were provided for all 1000 people ... and done skillfully in  a second language!

This International Health Care Campaign served the under-staffed and under-funded facilities listed below:

Day 1 - Orientation

Day 2 - Orphanage "Salome Ferro" - 45 boys (ages 6-16), Orphanage "Casa Acogida Virgen de la Natividad" - 15 girls (ages 11-16) + teachers

Day 3 - Inca tribe "Ccatcca" - 320 people

Day 4 - Girls' School "Colegio El Rosario" - 215 girls (ages 5-11) + teachers

Day 5 - School "Izchuchaca" - 377 students (ages 10-14) + teachers

Embracing this journey was not an easy task, and we often returned to our host families' homes physically and emotionally exhausted. Valuable lessons were learned that week, by everyone who was invested in this experience! We learned to adapt to situations, accept diversity, and embrace the global picture of health care. Every SF State Nursing student demonstrated their commitment to a lifetime of helping others.

... and next, "Nurses in Action" will be Ambassadors from San Francisco State University School of Nursing to South Africa, May-August 2014!  -  Dr. Brenda Lewis, RN, NCC

 

Nurses in Action!

Nurses in Action!

At the courtyard of the Orphanage Salome Ferro

Health Assessment on Inca "Cacateca" women

Nurses in Action with Orpahange "Casa Acogida Virgen de la Natividad"

Dr. Brenda Lewis, RN, NCC with an Inca tribe "Ccatcca" baby